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Monday, July 20, 2020 | History

1 edition of WHO guidelines for indoor air quality found in the catalog.

WHO guidelines for indoor air quality

Elisabeth Heseltine

WHO guidelines for indoor air quality

dampness and mould

by Elisabeth Heseltine

  • 397 Want to read
  • 20 Currently reading

Published by WHO in Copenhagen .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. 97-131).

Other titlesGuidelines for indoor air quality, Dampness and mould
Statement[edited by Elisabeth Heseltine and Jerome Rosen]
ContributionsWorld Health Organization
Classifications
LC ClassificationsTD883.15 .W56 2009
The Physical Object
Paginationxvi, 228 p. :
Number of Pages228
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24455677M
ISBN 109289041684
ISBN 109789289041683
LC Control Number2010369281
OCLC/WorldCa429024432

Listings of indoor air quality consultants can be obtained from AIHA’s Consultants Listing, although AIHA does not recommend specific consultants. Additional technical information is included in the following sources, available from AIHA's Marketplace: Recognition, Evaluation and Control of Indoor Mold, AIHA, (the Green Book). The guidelines are a basis for designing energy-efficient buildings while maintaining an indoor air quality which provides acceptable comfort and does not impair health. Read more Discover more.

  Sources of indoor air pollution include smoking, damp, the burning of fossil fuels and wood, dust, chemicals from building materials and furnishings, aerosol sprays and cleaning products. The authors warn that indoor air quality tends to be poorer in low quality housing where ventilation may be inadequate or insufficient. In this Guide, Indoor Air Quality refers to the total indoor environment, which encompasses air contaminants, lighting, noise, temperature, humidity and workstation design.A healthy indoor environment includes the following: adequate rate of fresh outdoor air supply; acceptably low levels of dusts, gases, vapours, and biological contaminants.

The WHO's Air Quality Guidelines for Particulate Matter, Ozone, Nitrogen Dioxide, and Sulfur set 50 μg/m³ as a hour mean concentration limit for PM₁₀. d: The WHO's Air Quality Guidelines for Particulate Matter, Ozone, Nitrogen Dioxide, and Sulfur Dioxide recommend ozone . Buy WHO Guidelines for Indoor Air Quality (): Selected Pollutants: NHBS, World Health Organisation.


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WHO guidelines for indoor air quality by Elisabeth Heseltine Download PDF EPUB FB2

This book presents WHO guidelines for the protection of public health from risks due to a number of chemicals commonly present in indoor air. The substances considered in this review, i.e.

benzene, carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, naphthalene, nitrogen dioxide, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (especially benzo[a]pyrene), radon, trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene, have indoor sources.

WHO guidelines for protecting public health are formulated on the basis of the review. The most important means for avoiding adverse health effects is the prevention (or minimization) of persistent dampness and microbial growth on interior surfaces and in building structures.

Related links. Air pollution; Household (Indoor) Air Pollution. The WHO guidelines for indoor air quality, developed under the coordination of WHO/Europe, address three groups of issues that are most relevant for public health: biological indoor air pollutants (dampness and mould) pollutant-specific guidelines (chemical pollution) pollutants from indoor combustion of fuels.

In certain cases where indoor air contains high concentrations of PAHs, however, air could be a major contributing source. This could be the case if a person spent the day in an ETS environment (4–62 ng/day) or in microenvironments fitted with non-airtight stoves (30– ng/day) 7 or cooked food in the Chinese style (91– ng/day).

8Cited by: Indoor Air Quality Guide: Best Practices for Design, Construction and Commissioning WHO guidelines for indoor air quality book designed for architects, design engineers, contractors, commissioning agents, and all other professionals concerned with indoor air quality.

Summary (Part I) and Detailed (Part II) Guidance provides: Hundreds of internal and external links to resources for the design, construction, and commissioning of. door air pollution.

Further guidelines on indoor air quality in relation to pol-lution emanating from specific chemicals and combustion products are under development. The WHO guidelines on indoor air quality: dampness and mould offer guid-ance to public health and other authorities planning or.

Indoor Air provides a location for reporting original research results in the broad area defined by the indoor environment of non-industrial buildings. An international journal with multidisciplinary content, Indoor Air publishes papers reflecting the broad categories of interest in this field.

Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) Learn how you can reduce your exposure to wildfire smoke inside your home. Was your home in a flood. Learn about flood cleanup.

Información relacionada en español. Radon is a health hazard with a simple solution. Test. Fix. Save a life. Find a Radon Test Kit. Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications and Technical.

Developing indoor air quality guidelines 2 Setting indoor air quality guidelines 4 Preparation of the guidelines 7 Combined exposures 9 Use of the indoor air quality guidelines in protecting public health 11 References 13 1.

Benzene 15 General description 15 Indoor sources 15 Pathways of exposure 17 Indoor concentrations 18File Size: 2MB. This book presents WHO guidelines for the protection of public health from risks due to a number of chemicals commonly present in indoor air.

The substances considered in this review, i.e. benzene, carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, naphthalene, nitrogen dioxide, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (‎especially benzo[‎a]‎pyrene)‎, radon.

10 Part I PRELIMINARY 1 Purpose The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines for good indoor air quality. 2 Scope and application This document applies to all buildings, new and existing.

Indoor Air Quality in Healthcare Facilities. Editors Its thoroughness of coverage makes this book a vital resource for professionals involved in every aspect of health service facilities, from planning and construction to maintenance and management.

Among the topics covered: Existing guidelines in indoor air quality: the case study of. Mold is not usually a problem, unless it begins growing indoors. The best way to control mold growth is to control moisture. This website provides guidance about mold and moisture for homes, schools, multifamily and commercial buildings.

Molds can have a big impact on indoor air quality. WHO guidelines for indoor air quality: selected pollutants: Publication Type: Book: Year of Publication: Authors: Publisher: WHO Regional Office for Europe: City: Denmark: ISBN Number: Abstract: This book presents WHO guidelines for the protection of public health from risks due to a number of chemicals commonly present.

This book provides a comprehensive overview of the scientific evidence on the health problems associated with this ubiquitous pollution and provides WHO guidelines to protect public health. It also describes the conditions that determine the presence of mould and Cited by: The SMACNA IAQ Guidelines for Occupied Buildings Under Construction, 2nd edition ANSI/SMACNA •, is intended as an authoritative source for providing project management guidance in maintaining satisfactory indoor air quality (IAQ) of occupied buildings undergoing renovation or construction.

The Guideline covers how to manage the source of air pollutants, control measures. taminants may cause odors, health impacts, and reduced indoor air quality. This chapter discusses proper design of exhaust stacks and placement of air intakes to avoid adverse air quality impacts.

Chapter 24 of the ASHRAE Handbook—Fundamentals de-scribes wind and airflow patterns around buildings in greater detail. Ian Cull is the president of Indoor Sciences and has worked in the indoor air quality and building science fields since Previously, he served as vice president of the Indoor Air Quality Association (IAQA) from and served as a director from Proactive organizations develop an indoor air quality management plan that describes procedures for preventing indoor air problems and responding to problems as soon as they are recognized.

As part of your organization's plan, you may want to include a short list of consultants competent in indoor air quality-related issues. Indoor Air Quality: The Latest Sampling and Analytical Methods, Third Edition is a practical, user-friendly guide to the identification and assessment of the indoor air contaminants that contribute to building-related illness in commercial buildings, institutions, and residences.

It covers the basic concepts of indoor air quality assessment, including its historic by: 2. Obtain a copy of "An Office Building Occupant's Guide to Indoor Air Quality," EPAK, October from IAQ INFO at Frequently, indoor air quality problems in large commercial buildings cannot be effectively identified or remedied without a comprehensive building investigation.WHO Guidelines for Indoor Air Quality: Dampness and Mould Euro Publication Public Health Series WHO guidelines for indoor air quality World Health Organization Europe: Author: World Health Organization: Editors: Elisabeth Heseltine, Jerome Rosen: Publisher: WHO Regional Office Europe, ISBN:Length: pages.Additional Physical Format: Online version: WHO guidelines for indoor air quality.

Copenhagen: WHO, © (OCoLC) Material Type: Internet resource.